London Fashion Week

So I haven’t blogged for a while (I know, I know) it’s terrible of me!

But what a topic to kick off with – it’s only London Fashion Week. Yes, it’s that time of year again, the bi-annual event has kicked off in all its glory. If you don’t know much about LFW (which I’m sure most of you will) this is where the A-List of celebrities, dressed in their finest of course, throng the front row of the catwalk and watch majestically, in awe of the endless leggy models pacing up and down in some of the world’s top designers’ newest seasons’ ensembles.

One model that comes to mind, you probably guessed it? Cara Delevingne, the girl that everyone’s talking about, the girl that all designers want to use to show off their fabulous creations. Take Mulberry’s collection on Sunday just gone, Emma Hill’s outfits just spoke for themselves. There was an array of floral patterns, swinging shapes and leather outfits, and of course modelled by our very own Cara Delevingne

 

Eurovision 2013 – The Fashion Stakes

Last night’s 58 year old canard, the Eurovision song contest features a drab four chord load of instantly forgettable tunes.  But some interesting outfits.  I like the fact that more and more acts are choosing to wear long dresses instead of the commoner leather or short appliqued frock horrors of the past.

Best dressed would have gone to Ukraine (was it Ukraine?) for that pale pink strapless gown except for the dress-maker failing to account for hip movement resulting in an unattractive bulge that destroyed an otherwise perfect column.

In a neon pink ball gown straight out of Star Wars,  the Compere or shall we say commere’s outfit was good in close up, framing her cleavage and balancing the butterfly beehive, but with those Japanese sleeves and ugly panel missing in the skirt ruined what could have been a timelessly elegant classic gown.  A typical example of a dress designed by committee.

Denmark’s winning number was not just in the tune.  This pretty ballet length hanky hem dress suited the song, the singer and deserved its place at the top. Talking of hankys what about the handsome Armenian with the scarves?  Is this a future trend, guys, or was he promoting his sister’s accessory company?  Skirts anyone?

Did anyone else see a singer in silver sequins fall off the stage during the “visit Sweden” promo song?

Germany’s beige sequined pageant gown with the hi-low hemline didn’t work for me.  The stiffness of that heavily beaded fabric looked clumpy as she moved about the stage; hi-low hemlines work best in a soft flowing fabric.

Britain’s Bonnie Tyler – well…..who’s idea was it to put her in a black off the shoulder cat suit?  Didn’t suit her, didn’t suit the song.  What more can one say?

Finland’s wedding dress certainly fitted the tune but ruined by the pink over boots and the back group in red PVC pinafores – golden showers, anyone?

Estonia, my favourite.  An elegant strapless flowing white gown. Pregnant she may be, but the dress was beautifully balanced nonetheless.

The Mathematical Queen

She’s mainly known for playing a big part in one of the most popular ever game shows, Count Down, in which she was part of for 26 years. That’s as old as me!

But nowadays Carol is mainly in the news relating to her current attire. Some articles give her credit, some slate her appearance. I’m neither here nor there about Carol, but she does pull it out of the bag every now and again with what she wears. She has a curvaceous figure and dresses it well (sometimes).

Some items she’s worn recently are maybe not to everyone’s taste? The skyscraper heels worn to her daughter’s birthday party last week, or the slight glimpse of ‘side boob’ on Thursday night. But one can’t say she doesn’t try – and generally, she gets its right!

Carol is pictured here in a Stella McCartney dress, worn to the British Inspiration Awards last night.

The Skirt

 

It is said to have been discovered back in 3,900 B.C. in Armenia, in the form of a straw-woven skirt. These garments have been worn by men & women over the years in many different cultures. This is still alive today, some men in Scotland wear kilts, as do some Asian men wear what is called, the Dhoti or Lungi, a piece of material that is wrapped around the waist and knotted, resembling a skirt.

Women’s dresses started to become a lot more varied in the 19th century than in any other culture. Waistlines originally started under the bust, called the ‘Empire Silhouette’, and they started to drift towards the natural waist. The skirt had started of quite narrow, but was now moving towards styles like the Hoopskirt or Crinoline skirt. This was all taking place around 1860s.

Then, skirts took a radical change in the beginning of the 20th century – the hem was no longer at the floor. Around the 1920s skirts became short(er), then in the 1930s, long again. Then throughout the War, skirts became shorter as there was a fabric restriction at the time.

And of course what came into fashion in the 60s? The Miniskirt by Mary Quant. She had dared to create this item the measured normally no longer than 4inches below the bottom. These skirts were so popular, as they are today, worn by teenagers, young adults and can also be seen in sport, such as skaters, cheerleaders and tennis players.

How To Measure Yourself

You may want some help when doing this.

Height

1. Stand straight with your feet together

2. Start at the top of your head and pull the measuring tape down to the floor (you may need some help with this)

3. Don’t wear shoes

Waist

1. Your waist is usually found 1inch above your bellybutton

2. Wrap the measuring tape around your waist, not so tight so allowing you to breathe comfortably

Hips

1. Your hips are generally about 7” below your waist (depending on your size)

2. Looking in a mirror, find the widest part of your hips

3. The measuring tape should brush across both of your hipbones

Shoulder

1. You start by measuring at the back, from one edge of the shoulder socket to the next shoulder socket

Bust

1. Relax your arms

2. Keep your bra on, as you’re not measuring your bra size

3. Pull the tape around the back across the shoulder blades, then under your arms and across the fullest part of your bust – take measurement

The Scrunchy – It’s back to stay!

This fabric covered elastic hair tie, huge in the 80’s. This fascinating accessory was commonly used to fasten long hair. You could find them in lots of shops in many elaborate styles, colours, fabrics and designs.

They sadly (and I mean sadly) started to fade out though when the bobble came along, with a ‘move out of the way’ sort of attitude. So as a nation we seemed to ditch our beloved favourite coloured scrunchies, and made way for this almost none apparent hair elastic.

Some may say these little hair bobbles were a factor for our damaged hair. As they were tied so tightly around our precious little strands of hair, it was only a matter of time before hair started to break off. Not helping was the hourly routine of taking both hands to separate the ponytail into two parts, and pull with force away from each other with one swift movement, and ta-da your pony was fixed for another hour or two. Inevitably breaking a few more stands each time.

But, I must admit, I am a self confessed hair elastic user for my some what fine head of hair. But after reading an article in the ever so excellent, Stylist last Wednesday, I saw that the scrunchie had made not only an appearance, but featured in its own article. To my happiness I went straight out that evening and bought some scrunchies from M&S – 2 for £5.00, one plain black and one leopard print, for when I’m feeling a bit more ‘And what?’ sort of day.

I love the scrunchie and I’m on a mission to buy bigger and more brightly coloured ones. And I shall also succeed in bringing back the scrunchie to The King’s Road – watch this space!


Tulisa’s Spanx v’s The Press

The National Television Awards aired last night. Programmes such as, Best Documentary Series, the winners Frozen Planet, which I was very pleased to hear. Best Drama, of which Downton Abbey claimed the prize.

But what caught my eye, as I reached for my iPhone during the add break read to through the trashy showbiz simply to pass time. Was the lovely half Greek Tulisa Contostavlos sporting (and very well may I add) an Eggshell Grecian Draped dress.

Now, not only do we hire out this dress, so it was a pleasure to see a very well known young lady in a gown many of our customers love too! But the poor girl was ammunition for the press, as unfortunately her Spanx ever so slightly showed at the top of where the dress splits. Which of course the sharks (press) took privilege in capturing for the whole world to see straight away.

But after thinking about it, which didn’t take long, w ho cares? I’ve been dressing women in evening wear for quite some time now, and mostly every women that enters into our studio for a dress fitting, will inevitably say ‘I’m going to have to wear my Spanx’ from skinny to curvy ladies, the young to the older generation.

They’re designed to give the wearer a slimmer and more shapely appearance, which will make you feel more comfortable and confident.

So, Tulisa if you’re reading this, believe me you won’t be the only girl out there with out her Spanx on, so don’t be ashamed!!