Belle of the Ball

Our beautiful client, Rachel (right) had her annual awards ceremony with work to attend earlier this month.

She’s full of confidence and not afraid to go glamorous. We decided on the full length gold strapless dress would be ideal.. next time round I’m sure she’ll be back to hire something even more elaborate.

Only 21 Once!

Our lovely lady Georgie, (first picture, right) is wearing our floor length strapless 1920’s style gold/silver dress.

She wore it to her friend’s 21st birthday party, (second picture, far right) These girls all look smashing. I’m sure a party to remember!

Charity Ball at The Grosvenor House

This gorgeous looking lady went to a Charity Ball last week at the Grosvenor House. In aid for the charity,  The Children’s Trust 30th Anniversary Ball.

“I want to thank you so much for your personalised, attentive service. You helped me find exactly the right dress for me, and the fact that you were able to tailor it to me was a wonderful extra benefit. I will definitely come back to you when the need next arises, and will also tell my friends.” Maria McHugh.

Eurovision 2013 – The Fashion Stakes

Last night’s 58 year old canard, the Eurovision song contest features a drab four chord load of instantly forgettable tunes.  But some interesting outfits.  I like the fact that more and more acts are choosing to wear long dresses instead of the commoner leather or short appliqued frock horrors of the past.

Best dressed would have gone to Ukraine (was it Ukraine?) for that pale pink strapless gown except for the dress-maker failing to account for hip movement resulting in an unattractive bulge that destroyed an otherwise perfect column.

In a neon pink ball gown straight out of Star Wars,  the Compere or shall we say commere’s outfit was good in close up, framing her cleavage and balancing the butterfly beehive, but with those Japanese sleeves and ugly panel missing in the skirt ruined what could have been a timelessly elegant classic gown.  A typical example of a dress designed by committee.

Denmark’s winning number was not just in the tune.  This pretty ballet length hanky hem dress suited the song, the singer and deserved its place at the top. Talking of hankys what about the handsome Armenian with the scarves?  Is this a future trend, guys, or was he promoting his sister’s accessory company?  Skirts anyone?

Did anyone else see a singer in silver sequins fall off the stage during the “visit Sweden” promo song?

Germany’s beige sequined pageant gown with the hi-low hemline didn’t work for me.  The stiffness of that heavily beaded fabric looked clumpy as she moved about the stage; hi-low hemlines work best in a soft flowing fabric.

Britain’s Bonnie Tyler – well…..who’s idea was it to put her in a black off the shoulder cat suit?  Didn’t suit her, didn’t suit the song.  What more can one say?

Finland’s wedding dress certainly fitted the tune but ruined by the pink over boots and the back group in red PVC pinafores – golden showers, anyone?

Estonia, my favourite.  An elegant strapless flowing white gown. Pregnant she may be, but the dress was beautifully balanced nonetheless.

The Skirt


It is said to have been discovered back in 3,900 B.C. in Armenia, in the form of a straw-woven skirt. These garments have been worn by men & women over the years in many different cultures. This is still alive today, some men in Scotland wear kilts, as do some Asian men wear what is called, the Dhoti or Lungi, a piece of material that is wrapped around the waist and knotted, resembling a skirt.

Women’s dresses started to become a lot more varied in the 19th century than in any other culture. Waistlines originally started under the bust, called the ‘Empire Silhouette’, and they started to drift towards the natural waist. The skirt had started of quite narrow, but was now moving towards styles like the Hoopskirt or Crinoline skirt. This was all taking place around 1860s.

Then, skirts took a radical change in the beginning of the 20th century – the hem was no longer at the floor. Around the 1920s skirts became short(er), then in the 1930s, long again. Then throughout the War, skirts became shorter as there was a fabric restriction at the time.

And of course what came into fashion in the 60s? The Miniskirt by Mary Quant. She had dared to create this item the measured normally no longer than 4inches below the bottom. These skirts were so popular, as they are today, worn by teenagers, young adults and can also be seen in sport, such as skaters, cheerleaders and tennis players.

How To Measure Yourself

You may want some help when doing this.


1. Stand straight with your feet together

2. Start at the top of your head and pull the measuring tape down to the floor (you may need some help with this)

3. Don’t wear shoes


1. Your waist is usually found 1inch above your bellybutton

2. Wrap the measuring tape around your waist, not so tight so allowing you to breathe comfortably


1. Your hips are generally about 7” below your waist (depending on your size)

2. Looking in a mirror, find the widest part of your hips

3. The measuring tape should brush across both of your hipbones


1. You start by measuring at the back, from one edge of the shoulder socket to the next shoulder socket


1. Relax your arms

2. Keep your bra on, as you’re not measuring your bra size

3. Pull the tape around the back across the shoulder blades, then under your arms and across the fullest part of your bust – take measurement