Modelling Shoot


This gorgeous lady hired one of our gowns for a modelling shoot recently.

The photographer is called, Rhody Sims, more of his brilliant work can be seen here http://www.rhodysims.com/

The Skirt

 

It is said to have been discovered back in 3,900 B.C. in Armenia, in the form of a straw-woven skirt. These garments have been worn by men & women over the years in many different cultures. This is still alive today, some men in Scotland wear kilts, as do some Asian men wear what is called, the Dhoti or Lungi, a piece of material that is wrapped around the waist and knotted, resembling a skirt.

Women’s dresses started to become a lot more varied in the 19th century than in any other culture. Waistlines originally started under the bust, called the ‘Empire Silhouette’, and they started to drift towards the natural waist. The skirt had started of quite narrow, but was now moving towards styles like the Hoopskirt or Crinoline skirt. This was all taking place around 1860s.

Then, skirts took a radical change in the beginning of the 20th century – the hem was no longer at the floor. Around the 1920s skirts became short(er), then in the 1930s, long again. Then throughout the War, skirts became shorter as there was a fabric restriction at the time.

And of course what came into fashion in the 60s? The Miniskirt by Mary Quant. She had dared to create this item the measured normally no longer than 4inches below the bottom. These skirts were so popular, as they are today, worn by teenagers, young adults and can also be seen in sport, such as skaters, cheerleaders and tennis players.

The Scrunchy – It’s back to stay!

This fabric covered elastic hair tie, huge in the 80’s. This fascinating accessory was commonly used to fasten long hair. You could find them in lots of shops in many elaborate styles, colours, fabrics and designs.

They sadly (and I mean sadly) started to fade out though when the bobble came along, with a ‘move out of the way’ sort of attitude. So as a nation we seemed to ditch our beloved favourite coloured scrunchies, and made way for this almost none apparent hair elastic.

Some may say these little hair bobbles were a factor for our damaged hair. As they were tied so tightly around our precious little strands of hair, it was only a matter of time before hair started to break off. Not helping was the hourly routine of taking both hands to separate the ponytail into two parts, and pull with force away from each other with one swift movement, and ta-da your pony was fixed for another hour or two. Inevitably breaking a few more stands each time.

But, I must admit, I am a self confessed hair elastic user for my some what fine head of hair. But after reading an article in the ever so excellent, Stylist last Wednesday, I saw that the scrunchie had made not only an appearance, but featured in its own article. To my happiness I went straight out that evening and bought some scrunchies from M&S – 2 for £5.00, one plain black and one leopard print, for when I’m feeling a bit more ‘And what?’ sort of day.

I love the scrunchie and I’m on a mission to buy bigger and more brightly coloured ones. And I shall also succeed in bringing back the scrunchie to The King’s Road – watch this space!